Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Interesting info Finnish-USSR border during war

Discussion in 'Winter and Continuation Wars' started by Kai-Petri, Sep 13, 2021.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    26,462
    Likes Received:
    2,208
    The Finnish Air Force responded to the Red Army air raids with series of night infiltration bombings of ADD airfields near Leningrad. Finnish bombers, Junkers Ju 88s, Bristol Blenheims, and Dornier Do 17s, tailed or in some cases even joined formation with returning Soviet bombers over the Gulf of Finland and followed them to their bases. Once most Soviet bombers had landed the Finnish bombers approached to bomb both the landed and still landing Soviet bombers and then they escaped in the ensuing confusion. The first major night infiltration bombing took place on 9 March 1944 and they lasted until May 1944. Soviet casualties from the raids could not be estimated reliably.[8]
     
    CAC and Mark McShane like this.
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    26,462
    Likes Received:
    2,208
    How the Finns Saved Helsinki from the Bombings of 1944 by using Cunning Deception Tactics

    How the Finns Saved Helsinki from the Bombings of 1944 by using Cunning Deception Tactics

    To force Finland to capitulate, the Soviet Air Force began a bombing campaign. This decision dated from the 1943 Tehran Conference, when Stalin proposed such measures as a resort to force Finland to cut its ties with Germany and settle for a separate peace agreement.

    How did they manage to do that? Well, first of all, visibility was very poor, because the sorties flew at night. The second and most important reason was the fires that were lit on the islands to draw the attention from Helsinki.

    Searchlights were used only on the eastern outskirts of the city to make the scenery look more convincing. They gave the impression that they were, in fact, the main defense ring confronting the bombers.

    During the second raid, on the night of February 16-17, the Soviet Air Force met with a stronger resistance. A squadron of 12 German Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 fighters with special night fighting equipment was flown from the Estonian front to confront the arriving bombers.

    As for Helsinki, a funny anecdote accompanies the tale of how the city escaped destruction during WWII. Just after the war, Allied Control Commission made an official visit to the capital of Finland, led by the Soviet General Andrei Zhdanov. Reportedly, the General was confused and bedazzled by the state of the city. He could not believe his eyes when he saw before him the Daughter of the Baltic, in all its glory and without a single scar.
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    26,462
    Likes Received:
    2,208
    Winter War and Italy

    As a fascist government, the Kingdom of Italy had staunchly supported Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War in his fight against the Second Spanish Republic supported by the Soviet Union. Italy therefore promptly responded to requests by the Republic of Finland for military assistance and equipment for use against the communist government of the Soviet Union. The Royal Italian Air Force (Regia Aeronautica Italiana) sent thirty-five Fiat G.50 fighters, while the Royal Italian Army (Regio Esercito Italiano) supplied 94,500 new M1938 7.35 mm rifles for use by Finnish infantry. However, Germany intercepted most of Italy's aid and only released it once peace had been made.[4] A handful of Italian volunteers also fought in the Winter War on the side of Finland.

    France and United Kingdom

    The British government sold the Finnish air force 30 Bristol Blenheim bombers and Gloster Gladiator fighters. U.S.-made Brewster B239 fighters came too late to participate in combat missions, and the same applied to ten Hawker Hurricane I fighters. The British government also provided small arms and ammunition, including a large number of Boys anti-tank rifles in 1939 and 1940.

    France also sent aircraft, including the Morane Saulnier M.S.406 fighter. In 1940, it was decided to send a new fighter, the CaudronRenault C.714. Six C.714s previously marked for shipment to the Polish Air Force were placed in containers and diverted to Le Havre harbour for shipment to Finland. On 12 March 1940, the first six aircraft were already on their way to Finland when news of the armistice between Finland and the Soviet Union was received. At the time deliveries were halted, ten aircraft were in containers at Le Havre waiting to be lifted to the ships and three more were on their way from Paris. The French Army also supplied small arms and ammunition, mostly of obsolete design.
     

Share This Page