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Soviet frigate Storozhevoy

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Kai-Petri, Nov 8, 2020.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Soviet frigate Storozhevoy - Wikipedia

    Storozhevoy (Russian: Сторожевой, "guardian" or "sentry") was a Soviet Navy 1135 Burevestnik-class anti-submarine frigate (NATO reporting name Krivak). The ship was attached to the Soviet Baltic Fleet and based in Baltiysk. It was involved in a mutiny led by Valery Sablin in November 1975.

    When Soviet authorities learned of the mutiny, the Kremlin ordered that control must be regained, fearing Sablin might follow in Jonas Pleškys's footsteps to ask political asylum in Sweden. Half the Baltic fleet,[4] including thirteen naval vessels, were sent in pursuit and were joined by 60 warplanes[4] (including three Yak-28 fighters), which dropped 500-pound bombs in the vicinity of the rebel ship. The aircraft also strafed Storozhevoy repeatedly. The ship's steering was damaged and she stopped dead on the water 20 miles from Swedish territorial waters and 330 miles from Kronstadt. After warning shots from the closing loyal warships, the frigate was eventually boarded by Soviet marine commandos. By then, Sablin had been non-fatally shot to his leg and detained by members of his own crew, who also unlocked the captive captain and officers.[5] All the complement from Storozhevoy was arrested and interrogated, but only Sablin and his second-in-command, Alexander Shein, a 20-year-old seaman, were tried and convicted.

    Gregory D. Young was the first Westerner to investigate the mutiny as part of his 1982 master's thesis Mutiny on Storozhevoy: A Case Study of Dissent in the Soviet Navy, and later in the book The Last Sentry by Young and Nate Braden. The thesis was placed in the United States Naval Academy archives where it was read by Tom Clancy, then an insurance salesman, who used it as inspiration to write The Hunt for Red October.
     
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  2. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ...apparently, Sablin was correct
    ..was he brave, insane, or both?......what did he think would happen to him??!!!
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Never know except I think he thought he could get away as everybody was drunk. The ship was worth gold as it was pretty much the latest technology of the USSR for sub hunting if I got it right.

    "At his trial in July 1976, Sablin was convicted of high treason and was executed by shooting on 3 August 1976, while Shein was sentenced to prison and was released after serving eight years. The rest of the mutineers were set free but dishonorably discharged from the Soviet Navy."
     

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