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Why do the jews stand out?

Discussion in 'Concentration, Death Camps and Crimes Against Huma' started by ZeJanIt, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Why need you understand their religion? If they are different, is that not enough and still keep your own Faith? No need for Faith changes. I think you are doing it the right way at the moment.
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Do we kill people with gas and Burn them by the millions? And feel not bad. Aztecs, American indians, Armenians, jews, ordinary people.....is that our purpose? I would not like to think it that way. The Spanish Church and witches...
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2021
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    We have seen the Wannsee plans and perhaps the movie so we know what was to be the end result. Total Jew free Europe. The nazi dream. Nothing less.
     
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  4. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    Well those who could see what was coming if they could afford it came to the states and other countries with their families. Why we had large Jewish communities in NY, LA, and other cities. Unfortunately many could not too bad for those who went to France thinking they'd be safe should have gone all the way to Spain. The Vichy French turned many into the Germans. The whole propaganda thing that Warsaw was a place to keep them safe and give them work. Yeah the Germans post a note saying they need 100 workers but if they didn't get enough volunteers they would kick in doors and grab whoever to make the quota.
     
  5. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Many of the Jews in Germany had been there for generations and were assimilated. They thought their assimilation was more important than their beliefs. The obvious ones, extreme conservatives and Hasids, were the first to go, but were quickly followed by "assimilated" German Jews. Your faith, not your nationality, stigmatized you.
     
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  6. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    Yeah read about that many of the older Jews were confused even served or supported Germany in wwi and considered themselves Germans. But as you noted it didn't have anything to do with nationality.
     
  7. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Holocaust is awful but do not forget that all weird ones died. Homosexuals, politically wrong beings, just listening to Allied radio ones. All went down the drain.
     
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  8. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    Yeah read that wasn't it the idea of the minister of finance because the state paid for the institutions and it would save a lot of money needed for weapons. Many were poisoned or shot. Bet they took care of the old and terminal I'll.
     
  9. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Active Member

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    The Third Reich had low tolerance for nonconformity. Not only Jews, but Roma, gays, leftists, Slavs, and non-whites, all were at risk.

    Around 5.7 million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust. About eleven million people were murdered either in extermination camps or by einsatzgruppen in the field. That alone tells us that many other demographics were targeted as well. To my mind the Holocaust embraces them all. I don't know how finely the Germans themselves defined untermenschen, but it seems to me they cast a fairly wide net.
     
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  10. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    Yeah the Germans were especially cruel to black soldiers they captured they saw it as a personal insult that a lowly race should even dare opposed them. That group in Belgium the towns people said the Germans tortured and beat them before executing them then the towns people buried and erected a memorial that is still cared and maintained by the town. A man who was alive at the time said the town wept for the murdered men because of the brutality the Germans made them suffer. Makes me wonder what the did to any nisei they may have captured and if any of my grand and great grand relatives had to endure anything, had relatives in the 100th and the 442nd but most had past on by the time I got to Hawaii to meet my relatives there.
     
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  11. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Like said, every block had an informer and if you disliked nazis, Sicherdienst would soon learn about that. And then it was camp Service or death By gas. The longer the war the harsher the punishment.
     
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  12. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Active Member

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    Certainly dissidents were a despised demographic, going all the way back to Hitler's first year in power, though at that time they were imprisoned but not executed. Whether we should consider those folks to be victims of the Holocaust or not is debatable.
     
  13. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Holocaust I guess is a different thing. However, they can be considered Nazi victims for being sent to camps for being critics of the government and its leader. Different excuse, same ending.
     
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  14. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Active Member

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    Agreed.
     
  15. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    Neither Germany nor the Nazis originated anti-Semitism. European Jews had been told where they could live, what occupations they could or not perform, and subjected to periodic pogroms and routine abuse at least since medieval times.

    AFAIK this happened almost exclusively in Christian countries. Until the 20th century Palestine situation, Muslims were generally tolerant of Jews, just imposing some restrictions and taxes as they did to other non-believers in their countries.

    Blood libel, accusations of witchcraft, conspiracy theories about the "Elders of Zion" plotting to suborn the countries in which they lived seem to have been a distinctly European Christian phenomenon, preparing the ground for Nazi atrocities.
     
  16. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Jewish emigration during nazi period:

    Expulsion – Plunder – Flight: Businessmen and Emigration from Nazi Germany

    1933 37,000
    1934 23,000
    1935 21,000
    1936 25,000
    1937 23,000
    1938 40,000
    1939 78,000
    1940 15,000
    1941 8,000
    1942-1944 8,500

    Source: Herbert A. Strauss, “Jewish Emigration from Germany: Nazi Politics and Jewish Responses (1),” Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook 25 (1980): 313-361, here Tab. VII, 326.

    With the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939, the chances of escape were drastically reduced. Once preparations for the deportations had been completed and the “final solution to the Jewish question” (“Endlösung der Judenfrage”) had begun to be implemented, emigration was formally declared illegal on October 23, 1941. Between 1941 and 1945 only about 31,500 Jews managed to escape from Nazi Germany. In all, some 30,000 political exiles and 270,000–300,000 Jewish émigrés were driven out of the Reich during the Nazi era. About one tenth of them were deported when the countries in which they had sought refuge were occupied by German troops, and perished in concentration camps.

    The International Situation
    If we now briefly consider the international situation, we should mention in particular the unsuccessful conference at Évian, France, which symbolized the harsher policy toward refugees that came to prevail in the thirties and forties.[22]At this ten-day conference on the French side of Lake Geneva in July 1938, convened by U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt and attended by delegations from thirty-two countries, any condemnation of the anti-Jewish policies of the Third Reich was avoided and no commitment was made to liberalize refugee policy. For the émigrés, the chances of finding a safe haven within Europe continued to worsen. In 1933, 72–77 percent of them had been admitted to European countries; in 1934 the proportion had sunk to 35–40 percent and by the middle of 1938 only one quarter were being admitted.

    From 1937 the United States became the main destination of German émigrés, particularly with the immigration quota regulations being less rigorously enforced by the American government. German immigration to the U.S. did not reach anything like the dimensions of the 1850s–1890s and was indeed on a smaller scale than during the Weimar Republic: we can estimate that, in all, 132,000 German Jews had emigrated to the USA by the end of the war.
     
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  17. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The Ghettos were not for safety. They were places to gather Jews for gassing later. And Warsaw was not the only place. If you have seen Schindler's list you know what I mean. The Jews were to be killed altogether. Hitler wanted Europe Jew-free.
     
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  18. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The Passenger: Lost German novel makes UK bestseller list 83 years on

    A novel written about the persecution of Jews in Germany in 1938 but which was then forgotten about for 80 years has made it onto a UK bestsellers list.

    Ulrich Alexander Boschwitz's The Passenger is about a Jewish man who - like the author - attempts to escape the rise of the Nazi regime.

    It was rediscovered in 2018 after the author's niece told an editor about it.

    The book has had stellar reviews and has now entered The Sunday Times list of top 10 hardback fiction bestsellers.

    The UK edition sold almost 1,800 copies last week to put it at number 10 on the list.

    It was written in the weeks after Kristallnacht (the Night of Broken Glass), the outbreak of mass violence against Jews in Germany and Austria in November 1938.

    Toby Lichtig noted in his review for the Wall Street Journal that The Passenger was "likely the first literary account" of Kristallnacht. He described it as "at once a deeply satisfying novel and a vital historical document".

    In the Sunday Times, David Mills wrote: "There have been a number of great novels about the Second World War that have come to light again in recent times, most notably Suite Française and Alone in Berlin. I'm not sure that The Passenger might not be the greatest of them."

    The Guardian's Jonathan Freedland described it as "is a gripping novel that plunges the reader into the gloom of Nazi Germany as the darkness was descending". He added: "It deserved to be read when it was written. It certainly deserves to be read now."
     
  19. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..how many c
    ....how many blacks were captured? compared to ''others''?
     
  20. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    IDK but I would think it would be low since blacks were not used as front line soldiers till late in the war. I really think the military was off when they thought blacks couldn't fight like during the civil war they had a hundred black regiments in the north and I think there was three in the south, that's interesting as the south originally made it illegal for blacks to take up arms. I think that was because they knew the north had thousands of blacks in service and any black northern troops caught they could supposedly legally execute them. Only one black during the civil war made officer and oddly it was in a southern regiment. During wwii most black units were used in supply graves registration, engineering. The navy used them in munitions handling and they had that revolt were they court marshaled a bunch of them when they refused to work saying they were forced to work under unsafe conditions and then weeks later they had that incident that blew up three munition ships an investigation proved the officers to speed up loading and unloading had ignored safety proceedures just as the black sailors had said, the remains of the pier and ships are still there as relics of the past.
     
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